Team National: The only product is "the dream"

by chris
(Alabama)

Let a guy come to the house and give me the pitch for this company.


Red flag #1: He was the friend of a friend who pitched to me cold after I bumped into the pair at a fast food restaurant.

Red Flag #2: I'd never met him before, but he claimed to be genuinely concerned with my occupational and economic welfare, and would really like to turn me and my wife onto this “wonderful opportunity.”

Red Flag #3: For 3 hours I talked to this guy before coaxing out of him the simple truth that Team National doesn't actually make any product of its own, but only sells memberships in some kind of discount club.

Red Flag #4: All the literature contained was success stories. Nothing more - no mention of the process, a product, any caveats or business prospective…just cherry picked best-case scenarios of success.

What rubs me the wrong way about this is that it ignores the basic rule of business – good sales depend on good products. At the end of the day, the only thing this company tried to sell me was "the opportunity to make lots of money", and while that may sound great on the surface, it's promise that preys on the weakest and shallowest of human desires.

I would rather get up in the morning, go to work, do something productive than to cold-sell my friends, my co-workers, or complete strangers I just met at a fast food restaurant for hundreds or thousands of dollars for the "opportunity" of making money.

The person's pitch to me was the dream of "never having to work long days again," or "being my own boss." There was never any concern that I was right for this job or that the job was right for me. This scattershot approach to making money seems suspect at best, desperate at worst.

It would seem that this pitch is designed to appeal to people who don't believe they earn what they are worth, or maybe who work too hard at a blue collar job to justify the hours and low pay. But frankly, that isn't me. I'm a professional, and I like my job, and I do it because I’m good at it and because I like to, not because I have to.

I also believe that I'm paid what I'm worth. I understand that not everyone can be so lucky, but picking candidates by their desire to make money rather than their skill or level of proficiency at…well at anything, is incredibly suspect. A legitimate business is primarily concerned with the quality of their work force, not the quantity.

There's an old saying that if you give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day, but if you teach a man to fish, he'll eat for a lifetime. Well, for Team National, it might be closer to "If you give a bunch of your fish, I'll teach you to beg everyone you know to give you all their fish, then we can all eat well, as long as people keep sending you their fish."

Is it a scam? Hard to say. Maybe there's something legit here. But my gut and my experience tells me that it lacks the ethics, integrity, consistency and simple concrete legitimacy that clocking for a day’s pay can provide, not matter how bad the job.

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It is indeed a scam!
by: Anonymous

Good on you for being leery of this outfit. The person that pitched you only wanted the $2200 and you in his down line. Team National is an old classic. The buyers club pyramid scheme. BIG savings later if you give them BIG bucks today.

I will bet he didn't mention that 90.6% of TM associates earned less than $470 in 2015.

AVOID. Keep your money and friends.

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